Should Alcohol Taxes Pay For Mental Health Programs? Do the Math

Improving the Mental Health System

According to a news release that was dated May 9, 2006, the “Standing Senate Committee On Social Affairs, Science and Technology” in Canada recommended the creation of a Canadian Mental Health Commission that will be responsible for significantly upgrading the Canadian mental health system. As stated by Senator Michael Kirby, the Chair of the Committee, “The Senate Committee is committed to improving the range, quality and organization of health and support services that are required by the tens of thousands of Canadians who are living with mental illnesses and addictions.”

Funding The Proposed Change

Based on an extensive three-year study on mental health and addiction, the Committee determined that it will cost $5.36 billion over a 10-year period for this mental health system upgrade. Where will these funds come from? According to the Committee, the revenue will come from raising the excise tax on alcoholic drinks by 5 cents per drink.

Part of the rationale for the 5-cent increase per drink was obviously the goal of raising the needed funds for the proposed changes in the mental health system. Another justifying factor for the price increase, however, was the fact that since each alcoholic drink will cost more, Canadians will be more inclined to drink lower-alcohol products such as beer and wine instead of liquor.

Let’s Do the Math

At first glance, this proposal seems to make sense. Why shouldn’t those who drink help finance a program that will provide them with a better mental health system? Why not let those who are part of the “problem” become part of the “solution”? This logic seems sound until you do the math. If $5.36 billion is needed to help finance the upgraded mental health system, then how many drinks will have to be consumed in a ten-year period to reach $5.36 billion dollars? The answer: 107,200,000,000 drinks. That’s 107 billion, 200 million drinks.

To arrive at how many drinks this is per year, all we have to do is divide this number by 10 (for the ten-year program) and the result is 10,720,000,000. This is still a huge number that fortunately can be “massaged” even more. According to The World Factbook website, the population of Canada was estimated to be 33 million people in 2006. Dividing 10,720,000,000 by 33,000,000 equals 325. Putting this in terms that the average person can understand, every man, woman, and child in Canada will have to consume 325 alcoholic drinks per year for the next ten years to finance the new mental health system! Simply put, these numbers are not realistic.

More Flaws

The “logic” of this proposed mental health program also breaks down when it is examined more deeply. For instance, why would people drink lower-alcohol products such as beer if the increased excise tax applies to all alcoholic drinks? To help understand this better, let’s use an example. Let’s say that the average shot in Canada currently costs $3.00 and the average beer costs $1.00. Based on the proposed price increase, if Joe drinks an average of 5 shots per week, his weekly average alcohol expenditure will be $15.25. When the numbers are calculated, this figures out to be 1.7% more than Joe would have spent before the proposed tax increase. Let’s do a similar exercise with beer. Based on the projected price increase, if Pete drinks an average of 5 beers per week, his weekly average alcohol expenditure will be $5.25. When the numbers are calculated, this figures out to be 5% more than Pete would have spent before the proposed tax increase. The point: since the proposed price increase affects higher-alcohol products (such as shots) proportionately less than their lower-alcohol counterparts (such as beer), why would Canadians switch to lower-alcohol products?

Alcohol and Mental Health

Another question. What if tens of thousands of Canadians, realizing that drinking alcohol is not good for their “mental health,” significantly reduce their alcohol intake or quit drinking alcoholic beverages altogether? Where will the money come from to offset this lack of revenue? In a similar manner, what if thousands upon thousands of Canadians who drink alcoholic beverages decide that they don’t want to pay the extra excise tax and, as a result, stop drinking alcoholic beverages? If this happens, where will the government get the money needed to transform the mental health system? In other words, does the Canadian government have a realistic “plan B” for this major transformation?

A Logical Contradiction

From a different perspective, isn’t it rather ironic that those who drink alcoholic beverages will pay for the revamped mental health system? Isn’t there a contradiction in logic somewhere in this proposal? Stated differently, if tens of thousands of Canadians have mental illnesses or are addicted to alcohol or drugs, wouldn’t the government want Canadians to drink LESS alcohol in order to reduce the existing alcohol abuse, alcoholism, and alcohol-related mental health problems? Yet according to the current mental health proposal, from strictly a financial standpoint, it would appear that the Canadian government is banking the entire mental health system upgrade on historical data that strongly suggests that Canadians will continue to drink at their current or even higher levels of consumption.

Budgetary Miscalculations

What happens, for instance, if there are cost overruns in the proposed mental health system? There are, of course, two “easy” solutions to this problem: increase the excise tax on each drink or motivate Canadians to drink even more alcoholic beverages. Either “solution,” however, is predicated on the fact that in order to “work,” the upgraded mental health system needs to be funded by Canadians who continue to drink alcoholic beverages.

Conclusion

It appears logical to conclude that the Canadian mental health system is in need of a major overhaul. As with most comprehensive government programs, however, the issue of funding becomes a major obstacle to overcome. The proposed Canadian mental health system upgrade is no exception. Based on the reasons given above, it seems obvious that the Canadian government needs to come up with alternate sources of revenue generation for this worthwhile project. Indeed, to point out one of the major “flaws” in the current proposal, consider the following question: When is more drinking a “good thing?” Answer: when it finances a nationwide mental health system upgrade. Something tells me that Andy Rooney from “60 Minutes” would have a lot of fun with this.

Mental Health – What’s That?

Mental Health is about finding a balance between dealing with the difficulties in life and using the opportunities life presents for further development. Mental power is primary in helping create good things in our life, and is the vehicle that helps us work toward our hopes, dreams and aspirations. Mental health is far more than the absence of mental illness and has to do with many aspects of our lives including. The mental health issues may mean an increased risk of alcohol abuse, smoking and poor diet and physical fitness.

Anxiety, stress and depression can make coping difficult for seniors who are often facing the physical, emotional and economic changes associated with aging. For instance, everyone I know that deals with hypertension, diabetes, or asthma cope maladaptive to stress; they have anxiety issues yet don’t get referred to psych. Most people with an anxiety disorder will try to avoid exposure to whatever triggers their anxiety.

In anxiety disorders, people tend to get anxious when they are faced with a particular situation. So, for example, as a mental health nurse you could be helping to care for and support a mother with severe post-natal depression young man facing the complexities of a mental illness such as schizophrenia someone experiencing anxiety and panic attacks which prevent them from functioning normally. Mental Power Signs the Symptoms in younger children. Depression and anxiety are the most common health conditions.

Depression is a real condition and isn’t just “life. Depression, the fastest-growing cause of long-term disability in Canada, is the most common among this type of disorder, which includes bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression), dysthymia, and seasonal affective disorder. The research team has also found that stress at work is associated with a 50 per cent excess risk of coronary heart disease, and there is consistent evidence that jobs with high demands, low control, and effort-reward imbalance are risk factors for mental and physical health problems (major depression, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders).

With mental health problems affecting one in four people in this region, and now among the main reasons for absence from work, no-one can afford to be blas̩ about their own mental health Рor that of their friends, family or colleagues. The Mental Power Foundation uses research and practical projects to help people survive, recover from and prevent mental health problems. Mental health problems are painful Рemotionally, physically, spiritually and socially.

Stress, depression and panic attacks are common conditions and they can all be successfully treated. Stress plays an important role in mental health. People just don’t taking account of the fact it’s just as life threatening and just as distressing as these major other illnesses. Such people often set themselves up for added stress by the rigid expectations that they hold. Some therapists suggest that by using positive self-talk and trying to restructure the WAY we look at events can offset the physical and mental effects of dealing with negative or stressful events in life.

Symptoms of Mental Illness Persistent sad, anxious or “empty” mood Agitation, irritability, restlessness, moodiness Withdrawal from community, social situations or formerly enjoyed activities Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness or burden Feelings of hopelessness and negativity Physical complaints that are hard to explain and resistant to treatment such as digestive disorders, headaches, heart palpitations and chronic pain Denial of obvious problems Increasing inability to cope with daily challenges, activities or small problems Overuse of alcohol, medications and/or drugs There are many types of mental illnesses.

African Americans in this study did not show a significant relationship between depressive symptoms and high-effort coping strategies, while Caribbean Blacks and white Americans experienced increasing symptoms of depression linked to increasingly high-effort coping, in relationship to other beliefs and values. Anxiety panic attack symptoms are impacting the quality of life of millions of people worldwide. The type, intensity, and duration of symptoms vary from person to person, but all mental illnesses are treatable.

Mental health is the key to overall physical health. Mental health is a human rights issue. But mental health is far more than merely the absence of mental illness. Mental health problems can’t always be seen, but the symptoms can be recognized.